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We all have seen electric cars on the street. They look very futuristic and demand a second glance from passers-by. And the convenience… you can drive them in the car pool lane, park and even charge it for free in some places. Great! Their price tag is still an impediment to their large adoption by consumers, though, even if incentives exist in many countries. Another reason for their slow expansion is the rather low drive range these vehicles offer. The longest range available on the market is 300 km (a little over 186 miles) in real driving conditions. Although this would be sufficient for the usual daily commute from home to office, people have the feeling this is not enough for the few times a year they’ve got to drive 500 km (over 310 miles), like to go celebrate Grandma’s 90th birthday. Well, we don’t call that selfishness - although we think you should visit Grandma more often - we call this range anxiety, or the fear of being short of gas (or electricity in our case). So that’s 300 km you can do before you have got to spend several hours at the charging station to continue on your journey and be on time for Grandma’s cake. You’d better order a three-course meal, with a long coffee, buy some newspapers and hoover the car to occupy your time while the car is charging. Fortunately, there is a solution to reduce your entertainment bill at the service; it is Fast Charging. If we could charge our EV to full capacity in the same time as we fill our gasoline tanks, range anxiety would not be such a problem. In this blog, we want to explore the complex problem of fast charging with Battery Design StudioTM, understand its implications and see whether there is anything that can be done to remedy this problem.
Automated solution of the inverse problem in electronics cooling
The majority of engineering simulations involve a known geometry, prescribed conditions and computation of the predicted results. However, the design question is often posed as the inverse: I have a desired result and need to know what conditions or what geometry will produce that result. For an electronics cooling situation, the inverse problem description might be that you have a targeted maximum temperature for the components and you need to determine what geometry will produce this for a given set of conditions, or alternatively, what are the maximum heat dissipations allowed for a given...
STAR-CCM+の導入をご検討のお客様を対象に、モデリングから 計算実行・結果処理までの一連の流れを実際に操作体験いただけます。
STAR-CCM+の導入をご検討のお客様を対象に、モデリングから 計算実行・結果処理までの一連の流れを実際に操作体験いただけます。
最適化ツールの導入をご検討のお客様を対象に、設計探査作業(最適化、 実験計画法、応答曲面等)の一連の流れを例題を通じてご体験いただけます。
High temperature processes are of vital importance in a number of industries, including cement, chemical, glass, metallurgy, refining and steel. With so many factors affecting the operational efficiency to consider, the stakes are pretty high for engineers to deliver a safe, reliable, efficient and environmentally friendly operation. That is why computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and reaction kinetic simulations of combustion processes to design systems are being increasingly utilized. They not only give the necessary insight into the complex physics but also help to significantly lower the cost of iterating between trials and prototypes. This is important when it comes to improving the current designs of processes and equipment such as gas and coal burners, glass and steel treatment furnaces, process and crude heaters, reformers and dryers and kilns.
Únase a Siemens PLM Software asistiendo a un taller gratuito sobre el desarrollo virtual y fabricación de productos de vanguardia para la industria naval, centrado en la simulación de CFD y la exploración multidisciplinar de diseño para aplicaciones navales. En este evento educativo, demostraremos cómo las herramientas automatizadas y robustas de simulación y desarrollo se utilizan cada vez más como una alternativa rentable a las pruebas físicas. Aprenda cómo la simulación ayudará a evaluar y mejorar los diseños con el fin de reducir las necesidades energéticas del buque y sus impactos...
My 6-year old son entered my office when I was working on the video below. He looked at it with amazement and asked me “Oh! Mummy, is that real fire?!” I stopped for a second to think and then answered “Kind of. It is real fire, but in the computer. We calculate how the real fire burns.” After a half-impressed and half-puzzled “wow!?” he cheerily jumped out of my office again and probably forgot all about it within 2 minutes.
High-temperature processes involving combustion and reacting flows are commonly encountered in the glass, steel, cement, metallurgy, refining and petro/chemical industries. Achieving these goals requires innovating current designs of processes and equipment such as: Gas and coal burners Glass and steel treatment furnaces Process and crude heaters Reformers Dryers and kilns, etc. Engineers increasingly rely on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and reaction kinetic simulations of combustion processes to use methodical approaches in designing such systems. With increasing energy efficiency,...

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