A well ordered workshop – is it inherently capable of making us more productive? Is it really worth the effort to get organized? Steve Jobs offered the following thought: “That's been one of my mantras - focus and simplicity. Simple can be harder than complex: You have to work hard to get your thinking clean to make it simple. But it's worth it in the end because once you get there, you can move mountains.”

When you spend as much time in an airplane as I do, you learn to appreciate the performance of the environmental control system (ECS). Modern ESC systems are marvels of engineering with complex mechanisms to control pressure, temperature, humidity and air quality to ensure a comfortable environment for hundreds of passengers. In spite of the significant investment airframers have made over the years, customers are looking for a more comfortable ride. With more and more entries into the regional jet market, airframers are looking for ways to differentiate their planes by providing an upgraded customer experience.

A well organized workshop, purposely conceived to build and revise things of interest, is truly appealing with its array of tools, carefully ordered, in a familiar and comfortable environment. Now you’ve probably heard the expression “Use the right tool for the right job.” That works when you know what tools you have in your workshop, what they are supposed to do and exactly where you can find them. With the STAR-CCM+® v11.06 release, we’re adding and upgrading tools that will improve your ability to productively build and revise your simulations. You’ll be able to set up your simulations more comprehensively and consistently with a reduced likelihood of errors. And you’ll be able to more efficiently conduct critical reviews in the deeper details of your simulations with your colleagues and your customers. In part one of this blog, I’ll be talking about Simulation Parameters and Global Tagging.

In an increasingly competitive automotive market, customers demand a comfortable cabin environment for their vehicle. At the same time a combination of consumer demand and fuel and emission targets require that this cabin environment be delivered in the most energy-efficient way. Balancing these requirements represents a difficult engineering challenge.

It is no secret that the oil and gas industry has been experiencing some extremely difficult times over the last few years. During this market downturn that has seen barrel prices plummet, more oil and gas companies are finding that simulation is a viable solution. In fact, simulation is one of the more important tools oil and gas companies can use to trim costs and save money.

As any connoisseur of champagne or beer knows, not all bubbles are the same. Creamy champagne and gassy stout have never caught on, although the former sounds vaguely appealing! The same goes for droplets for that matter – nobody likes a shower that produces a fine mist rather than an invigorating spray. These examples are an indication that the nature of a fluid is dramatically changed by the size of the droplets or bubbles contained within it.

Note: Medical Design Technology first published this blog at in May 2016.

Medtronic, one of the world’s largest medical technology services and solution companies, was tasked with the challenge of assessing the flow field for adequate solution mixing for a biomedical experiment. Medtronic turned to a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation to assist with finding a solution.

Originally conceived as pure test of athletic ability, the motto of the Olympic games is “Citius, Altius, Fortius”, which is Latin for "Faster, Higher, Stronger". However, Olympic competitors are increasingly supplementing hard work and training with engineering simulation in their quest for Olympic glory. As the the sun sets over Rio and the Games of the XXXI Olympiad I decided to investigate some of the ways engineering simulation is influencing the outcome of Olympic sporting events.

For many years, CD-adapco has been the market leader for Internal Combustion Engine (ICE) simulation.

The recent Silverstone Formula Student competition highlights the reasons for the success of university formula car events. Few student projects allow undergraduates to demonstrate so many skills needed for real-world engineering roles. Team members engage in car design, project management, procurement, testing, and even sponsorship fund raising. Engineering simulation software is heavily used for aerodynamics, suspension designs and internal cooling systems and some team leaders spend as much as 40 hours per week on team duties in addition to their school studies.


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Matthew Godo
STAR-CCM+ Product Manager
Brigid Blaschak
Communications Specialist
Stephen Ferguson
Marketing Director
Dr Mesh
Meshing Guru
Joel Davison
Lead Product Manager, STAR-CCM+
James Clement
STAR-CCM+ Product Manager
Sabine Goodwin
Director, Product Marketing
Deborah Eppel
Technical Marketing Engineer