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Just one numerical simulation contains a wealth of information – we can gain a lot of insight on how a device performs, and from that, we can infer how to make that device better. To confidently recommend one design over another, though, we’ll need to run more than one simulation. As our device knowledge is informed through simulation, we can expect to make numerous geometry/part modifications to the original design. How quickly we can turn these changes around will determine how many simulations we can run within our time budget. Without a highly efficient and flexible workflow, we might find ourselves in the position of being less certain of our final product recommendation. Risky.

Now, you’ll be hearing a lot soon about Design Manager, a native capability within STAR-CCM+ v12.04® to do design exploration – that’s not this story. Instead, I want to share how two mouse clicks can now get you quickly from that first simulation to the next one, and to the one after that and the one after that...

As we move into the summer months, I am ever thankful that modern commercial aircraft systems have been developed to provide a safe and comfortable passenger experience. The Environmental Control System (ECS) is responsible for keeping the cabin at a comfortable temperature, pressure and humidity throughout the flight profile. This is done through a complex system of ducting, pressure regulators, heat exchangers and air conditioning components. Before the FAA can certify a new aircraft for commercial flight, the manufacturer has to be able to provide proof that the system can respond to situations where things go wrong.

When my kids were younger, one of the favorite entertainment options at children’s parties was the balloon artist. These artists were able to make anything from a monkey to a pirate hat simply by twisting balloons together. Usually, but not always, you could tell what the animal or object was meant to be, but it would take the most imaginative child to see the multi-colored lumpy lion in front of them as the real thing.

Whilst lions are not the most common shape for non-spherical DEM particles, should you have the need to model such a thing, previously your only option would have been the composite DEM particle and the result would have been much the same, a bunch of spheres of various sizes stuck together.

All of that is set to change with the polyhedral DEM particle in STAR-CCM+® software version 12.04. Now you will be able to accurately model real objects, putting the corners back into your particles, by building or importing a realistic representation as a geometry part which then forms the basis of your particle. For many objects, this new polyhedral particle is less computationally expensive then a composite particle which can require many spheres to get close to a realistic shape. Polyhedral particles also provide a more efficient solution, reducing simulation time.

As an effect of globalization, the patent life of newly discovered drugs has decreased considerably, forcing manufacturers to minimize drug development time as well as maximize throughput. To achieve this, existing manufacturing processes need to be upgraded, and new approaches and methodologies developed. Simulation applying CFD and optimization is an ideal tool to investigate such concepts early in the design phase, tying it into the Product Life Cycle Management Process – and thus avoiding costly troubleshooting exercises later.

What are the trends and developments when it comes to Lyophilization? Are the simulation methods and tools for this technology ready for prime time? Alina Alexeenko, Professor for Aero and Astronautics at Purdue University and the Co-Director of LyoHUB, was able to answer these questions for us.

Matthew Godo
STAR-CCM+ Product Manager
Stephen Ferguson
Marketing Director
James Clement
STAR-CCM+ Product Manager
Joel Davison
Lead Product Manager, STAR-CCM+
Dr Mesh
Meshing Guru
Ravindra Aglave
Director - Chemical Processing
Karin Frojd
Sabine Goodwin
Director, Product Marketing